Ipponnawa Intensive (March 2019)

Date & Time:Sunday, March 31, 2019
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM  
Location:Church of Kink Kawartha
(Peterborough, Ontario)
(To be provided upon payment)
Cost:$100/Couple or Special two-day price of $150
Dress code:Comfortable clothing, recommend no underwires for women

Within shibari, there is the practice of ippon nawa (一本縄), the use of a single length of rope; how oneness permeates every element of the universe: how we unite with friends, lovers, relatives, intentions – unity through oneness is an expression of freedom: “through unity comes multiplicity.”

A series of Kata (forms; 型) and henka (transitions; 変化) will be expressed in order to explore the application of “economy of resource” (the use of what rope is available), and the application of “Merihari” (cadence and rhythm; 減張), and how that changes whether a scene is sensual or sadistic, relaxing or exciting.

Hosted in the glorious Church of Kawartha Kink (CoKK), we will have room enough for a maximum of ten couples for this event! So send us your payment to reserve your spot fast!

Prerequisites

Skill level – knowledge of how to tie a single column tie of your preference and basic hitches (Such as the Munter Hitch and the Half Hitch) is recommended (this will not be covered in the class, though it will have been covered in our Beginners intensive).

About the instructor

Luke (Atemi) has been practicing the art of Japanese rope bondage Since October 2012, and began teaching and performing on stage since May 2015. Having practiced martial arts for 24 years, and leading a academic research team on the subject, Luke draws from a wide range of resources for instruction. He has performed onstage for MondeoseMorpheus Bondage Extravaganza, and Club M4, and has a fast growing public career in bondage.

For those intending to attend the two day intensive (both Saturdays beginners class and Sundays single rope intensive), there is a special bundle pricing of $150 for both Saturday and Sunday intensives.

  • For just the Sunday intensive, please send $100 to our PayPal HERE or Bank eTransfer to atemi.shibaridojo@gmail.com (use the password “singlerope”)
  • For both the Saturday and Sunday intensive, please send $150 to our PayPal HEREor Bank eTransfer to atemi.shibaridojo@gmail.com (use the password “masterroperope”)

For further inquiries, please email us with the following form:


2019 Theme – Ipponnawa 一本縄

In the effort of having a theme every year with which to direct my practice, expanding concepts, and going just a little deeper into the art, I really took a while (okay a few days of going around in circles), but I finally settled, though the deeper I reflect on what I chose, the more it demands…

ichinawa-ipponnawa-singlerope-shibari-kinbaku
Examples of what can be done with a single rope. (Model: CutieTie)

Often times, I will refer to my research in classical Japanese martial arts, and the literature around that for inspiration, and this time was no different. This time around, it was from the teachings of a very old samurai school called Kukishinden-ryu. Within their teachings of the use of the jutte (a sort of sword capturing truncheon) there is discussion of the use of the rope for arresting as well as the use of improvised and concealed weapons (essentially, all small weapons should be used as concealed weapons). Within these teachings, there is the following statement:


一筋縄多縄仏心十縄の構
(Hitosujinawa Tajō Busshin Jūjō no kamae
“The attitude that a single rope multiplies into the ten ropes of Buddha’s mind.”)

(Kukishinden-ryu Jupposessho no maki)

This correlates to the teachings of the “Ten Oxen” (jūgyū; 十牛), which is a series of short poems and accompanying drawings used in the Zen tradition to describe the stages of a practitioner’s progress toward enlightenment, and his or her return to society to enact wisdom and compassion. Though I’m very much tempted to write out my own commentary of this resource here, I will simply link to the translation and commentary that i am working off of HERE.

Ryōte kubi (両手首) Both wrists binding, double column. Demonstrated by Yukimura Haruki and Kawakami Yuu.

All that being said, it is from the exploration of this idea and the implementation of using just a single rope, that we will explore the possibilities of what can be done with just one rope. This will demand exceptional resource management, ingenuity, and some nice tight ropes!

The new Suspension Frame

So, two days ago, we finally got the suspension frame set up at the studio, and it is a glorious beast!

But being the silly bugger that I am, I’m overly concerned as to what to call it…

hidatorii
Torii gate at Hida Minzoku Mura Folk Village

The things that inspired it was a combination, of the Japanese-styled Torii, European-styled gallows, and classical illustrations of what was used in Japanese suspension torture.

Initially, I was going to simply call it a Torii (鳥居), but the design itself eventually shifted towards something more like gallows, and being endlessly inclined towards the Japanese language, I turned to the dictionary, for which I found the term Kōshudai (絞首台).

tombstone_courthouse_gallows
Gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park, Tombstone, AZ.

The problem with Kōshudai, however, is that it literally refers to gallows and the activities therein:

  • ” (絞) means to strangle;  constrict;  wring.
  • Shu” (also read kubi; 首) refers to the anatomical neck.
  • Dai” (Tai or several other pronunciations; 台), is a pedestal; or a stand.

So this specifically refers to a pedestal for hanging or strangling the neck – not quite what we do or want to encourage.

There is also the late Yukimura Haruki‘s term kamoi (鴨居)[1], however, this is specifically the frame for sliding doors in classical Japanese houses, for which he made considerable use of in his work. Thus, this term is further away from what we are looking for than even the gallows.

033-kamoi
A photo of a kamoi over a sliding door.

At this point, Kōshudai seems the closest to what were dealing with in regards to shibari and kinbaku, where the body is suspended by rope in various formations.

Notes:

[1] Kamoi (鴨居) Means lintel. In traditional Japanese house it’s the beam where the top of sliding doors (fusuma; 襖) or paper windows (shoji; 障子) can be inserted and slide. It’s really easy to find pictures of people tied up to the kamoi.

 

 

atemi-self-suspension
Atemi self-suspending off the new suspension frame!

Hokijiri in Technique

Having gotten to play with the hokijiri a bit now I’ve certainly been impressed and surprised by it’s performance.

Hokijiri Design

Illustration from the famous Ito Seiu, illustrating muchiuchi (flogging with the hokijiri) in corporal punishment.

Firstly, it’s very design is rather remarkable. The fact that it’s bamboo, thus filled with sections of hollow air pockets, means that it is inherently quite light. And then the bamboo is split, which assists in absorbing and shock from impact and reducing bounce, thus improving energy transfer for each strike. the layer of tightly bound jute burlap of course provides a certain layer of cushioning (seemingly for the bamboo, not so much for the recipient). Finally, the string binding the entire length of the hokijiri balances it and gives the whole length a certain tension that makes it feel quite elegant in the hand. Over all it is a deceptively light implement that delivers a considerable impact to varying degrees.

Hokijiri Technique

I managed to devise three particular techniques for striking with the hokijiri:

Sharp Strike

This is a sharp, whipping strike delivered largely with the wrist with a sort of snap feeling. Results in a sharp stinging pain and welts. Somewhat similar to the impacts commonly found in kali and escrima.

Weighted Strike

This is allowing the weight of the hokijiri to carry the impact; holding it loosely in your hand, simply drop your arm and allow the balanced weight of the implement to strike the body. This produces more of a “hollow shockwave” feeling upon impact and produces minimal welts or bruising.

Stick and Push Strike

This is a little bit like the follow-through strike with a kendo shinai. Upon striking, don’t let the hokijiri bounce, but instead immediately apply pressure with the strike, “stick” with it and “push-through”. This appears to leave less welting and more bruising, and has a sense of being a very “holistic” pain.

So over about 45 minutes I was able to devise three different strikes with this implement, try to see what else you can do!

Hokijiri in Material Discussion

hokijiri-detail
Closeup of the braiding detail on the Hokijiri.

There was question of binding the hokijiri with hemp or just instead of cotton (currently used) or paper string. What follows is my observations, considerations, and response to the inquiry:

Traditionally the hokijiri was bound in paper string, which added weight and solidity to the implement which was by its nature hollow. The way of binding with hitches all the way up the spine gave it a very elegant balance. I used cotton simply because paper string is expensive in fairly small quantities, while I can get large rolls of cotton string at the dollar store for $1-5 each. I will be implementing paper string binding at a later time and have it as an option on the shop.

For the hemp twine, I’ve been thinking of doing that myself just to see how it turns out. The first thing on my mind is that the hemp and jute are both heavier than either paper or cotton, and in my experience the exquisiteness of the hokijiri comes largely from the deception of it’s weight (light and elegant as a feather, but hits like a horse). The other thing is that depending on the diameter of the twine, it may make it wider, which of course changes the experience as well.

In the near future, I will be offering selective options for variations and design of the hokijiri, but for now it’s on a case by case selection via email or messaging.

If you want to experience the exquisite excellence of this cane, place your order on our Etsy Shop!