Honor: Nawashi and Dorei

In a practice of Kinbaku and Shibari, it can be considered a matter of honor that the rigger will observe the model through their reactions and the expressions awakened by the rope. The rigger is perceived as deserving of those proposals through their demonstration of their ability to achieve balance between immobility, the lightness of the suspension, and the beauty of the whole, through expressions of the bottom. That is why an experienced rigger focuses on maintaining a constant visual and energetic contact with his rope, allowing the embrace of the strings flow naturally. An approach that is strong in this is Yukimura haruki’s approach to Shibari.

In a certain respect of skill in regards to the rigger, is considered a matter of honor to include the third rope in a takatekote (高手小手). It expresses an honor to the bound, the the rigger, his Sensei and spectators (in addition to providing more support surface, more comfort and safety).

At a certain point the skill of the rigger could be identified or judged for his skill if excess rope is left lose and left hanging in the front; breaking aesthetic singularity and leaving clutter in the presentation.

Simple single-point suspensions may be presented, but they do not tend to be spectacular and give off the impression of simple-mindedness if that is the only proposed presentation. All that is shown in these cases, is the high level of tolerance for pain for the tied model. One could say that there is no glory for the rigger if all they are attempting to present is how much pain they can inflict, or how their model endures.

Futomomo-honor-photoshoot

The extreme positions and single-point suspensions should be achieved progressively, so as to go gradually leading to tied through an ordered set of consecutive presentations, to finally achieve the ultimate ideal.

A lot of presentations in Kinbaku and Shibari ties in hundreds of years of history since antiquity as some important parts of this practice does borrow from the presentation of prisoners in the feudal era, and also in considering how much it borrows from Japanese aesthetics, some of which  date back over a thousand years. That is why these tying patterns (kata; 形) are known for their historic charm and beauty for its distinctive oriental flavor, expressing what a great honor it is to be the rigger, as well as for the model.

Some of the borrowed Hojojutsu ties include:
hishi or Hishigata” (diamond)
“Kikkou” or “Nyugarame” (tortoise shell), recognizable by its hexagonal shape
ebi” tying the “shrimp” or” shrimp” in which the subject is sitting cross-legged (Indian style) and torso is strapped around the ankles in a submissively bent position.
tsuri” or “tsurizeme”: one of the classic torture techniques of Tokugawa Japan has become one of the mainstays of current Kinbaku and Shibari.

Other presented ties include the mushi imo (caterpillar tie; 芋虫), Kaikyaku kani (廻客蟹)) and teppo (rifle; 鉄砲) are much more recent and come from a time when it was intended that featured riggers such as Itoh Seiyu and Minomura Kou, baptized their bonds in the same way in which artists baptize their paintings or sculptures. These proposals, while not with as old a historical burden, are also of great honor because both Itoh Seiyu as Kou Minomura are considered the creators of what is now called Kinbaku and Shibari.

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